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Global Statistics

All countries
179,871,733
Confirmed
Updated on June 22, 2021 11:03 pm
All countries
162,902,441
Recovered
Updated on June 22, 2021 11:03 pm
All countries
3,896,125
Deaths
Updated on June 22, 2021 11:03 pm

Himalayan Range: The Himalayan range is visible when the weather is clear! Student and professor’s study rejected this claim


New Delhi
For the past several centuries, the hills of the Himalayan range have been claimed to be seen from a distance of a few hundred kilometers when the weather is clear. During the lockdown, the mountains of the Himalayan range were claimed to be seen from many places due to a slight reduction in pollution. However, all such claims have now been challenged.

This study is of high school student Arnav Singh and his mentor Professor Vijay Singh, who is also the President of Indian Association of Physics Teachers.
By calculating the size and distance of the object as well as the intensity of the light, he found that such claims of mountain sightings were not true. The viewer must have been confused by seeing a large range.

Claims have been made from Jalandhar in Punjab to Dhauradhar range and from Bhagalpur in Bihar to Mount Jomolhari range. But Arnav and his mentor found that due to the curvature of the Earth’s orbit, one can see only a maximum distance of 301 km from the peak of Mount Jomolhari range. This distance is less than the distance of 366 kms between Bhagalpur to Jomolhari Peak.

Sir William Jones, the founder of the Royal Bengal Society, claimed to have seen the Jomolhari range from Bhagalpur in 1785. In such a situation, the question is being raised from the claim of the new study, which range did Sir William see? According to Arnav and Professor Vijay, the range that Sir William saw could be Mount Kanchenjunga. It falls in the direction of Bhagalpur to Jomolhari and the distance is also 297 kilometers.

The study of Arnav, 17, and 71-year-old Professor Vijay, who was a faculty at IIT, was published in the American Journal of Physics last month. The referee and the US editor also praised this detailed research.

symbolic picture

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