WHO chief warns, delta variant of corona virus is very dangerous, constantly changing


United Nations/Geneva
The head of the World Health Organization has warned about the delta variant of the corona virus found for the first time in India. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that the world is in a very ‘dangerous phase’ of the COVID-19 pandemic, whose delta-like forms are more contagious and are constantly changing over time. He said that in countries where less population has been vaccinated, the number of patients in hospitals has started increasing again.

“The delta-like form is more contagious and is spreading in many countries,” Tedros told a news conference on Friday. At the same time, we are in a very dangerous phase of this pandemic. Gebreyesus said, ‘No country is out of danger yet. The delta pattern is dangerous and it is changing with the passage of time which needs constant monitoring. He said the delta form has been found in at least 98 countries and is spreading rapidly in countries with fewer and more vaccinations.

“Public health and social measures such as strict surveillance, screening, early detection, isolation and medical care are still important,” the WHO chief said. The WHO Director-General said that it is important to apply masks, social distance, avoid crowded places and adequate arrangements to keep the houses ventilated. He urged world leaders to come together to ensure that by next year 70 percent of the population of each country is vaccinated against COVID-19.

He said, ‘This is the best way to end the epidemic, save lives, restore global economic and prevent dangerous forms from occurring. We are urging leaders to vaccinate at least 10 percent of people in all countries by the end of this September. The WHO said this week that the delta form, first detected in India, is now being found in about 100 countries.

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